Social Media and the Government Shutdown

[image] Social media is making this shutdown unlike any before.

It's the sixth day of the government shutdown. But what makes this shutdown different from the other seventeen? FOX54'S Breken Terry explains.

17 years ago during the last shutdown, cell phones were just becoming a big hit, 29 million Americans had personal computers, and the internet was still a growing trend..

Fast forward to the 2013 shutdown-politicians taking to twitter, pointing fingers of blame, different sites poking fun at the shut down, and citizens directly telling Washington what they think.

Logan Smith, a Huntsville resident, says, "Hearing what the politicians have to say other than just what you know from the news media, you know, they actually get their people out and get to express what they wanna say rather than the news media hyping everything up their way and putting their spin on it."

This is the first shutdown in the age of social media. White House Press Secretary, Jay Carney,  called out Speaker of the House John Beohner in a tweet over allowing Congress to vote.

But some say social media can be a double edged sword.

Rebekah Schmidt says it hurts her to see people making fun of this issue on social media. "It's made for a lot of real time information, [but] I think its also created an ill-informed public in the way that a lot of younger people just see a name or a picture on Facebook and they take that as truth when really there is a lot more going on. There is a lot more going on than just a joke on the internet. It's real. It's affecting real peoples lives. The longer it takes the government to open back up, the more of an impact it will have."

Schmidt is one of the many people directly affected by the government shutdown.

"My husband's military and for one, our military dues expired last week and we weren't able to get new ones because the place is shut down. In addition, I'm due in November and if the government doesn't open back up, we're gonna have issues with Tricare getting my son enrolled and it's just gonna be a huge hospital insurance battle."

And it appears the battle is no where close to over.


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